Tarati – Touchless Cellphone

Tarati (in Sanskrit, meaning through) is a step towards rewriting cell phone history. Tarati enables the user to connect with others by passing fingers, in order, through key holes. This action of dialing alone is a more magical experience and, hence, more indicative of what’s really happening beyond the visible realm. Tarati beckons the user to touch someone without physically touching a single key. Its design reflects human connectivity in a less material/mechanical, more sensual, way. Tarati is a subtle device, but ever-so-powerful in its fearlessness.

Product Page: Nonobject [ Via: Gizmodo ]

21 Comments

  • o m G !!! says:

    s-t-uPID i think you can’t take a picture with it is that technology wtf just give me some pocket pc with wich you can call , a navigator and more in it. thank u

    the only good point is ; there are no keys so they can’t block no more

  • “o m G !!!” has a point but it was quite painful to read.

    This does really look like design for design’s sake. There is no real functional advantage to this method of dialing. It looks like it would actually take longer to dial.

    In terms of aesthetics the novelty would wear off quickly and you’d want to snap the thing in half (this looks quite easy to do). Just a bit of fluff, really.

  • karora says:

    The desing would have been useful when cellphone started but not now when technolgoy has converged so much that you’ve PDA, DigiCam, Music, Video, so much stuff in your
    phone.

    Someone with biggg fingers can’t even get this thing to work :-)

  • P says:

    unfortunately, I agree with luke. It’s a wonderful exploration of concept, experience, and it definitely breaks the mold in human-device interaction, but I think this is where the project’s influence and purpose stops. Practically, I don’t think it’s very useful in that one of the more important aspects of finger-button interaction is tactile feedback. Even touchscreen devices like the iPhone have the tactile feedback of the user’s finger “bouncing” off the screen once a selection is pressed. With this design, all tactile feedback is lost, and the user must apply force both in the downstroke and the “upstroke” (pulling the finger out of the hole) when making a selection. The whole process may be conceptually “serene” but it’s probably also very slow, time consuming, and i’m imagining having to look at the keypad as I dial, no matter how used to the phone i get.

  • Bryan says:

    I’m just waiting for those iPhone users to say… Where’s my tactile feedback?

  • Edwin says:

    I think its very good to go back to the main use of the phone dialing, the gps, the music and everything else are needs that big companies create to want us more and more but having a phone which is only a phone its quite good in my opinion, it make us use our brain again.

  • Jade Doel says:

    How beautiful would it be to see this on a table across from you at a cafe. I would be intrigued to watch the person pick it up and put it to their ear. I like it, It makes you want to figure it out.

  • Ronin_id says:

    Should have spent more time designing something that really solves a human problem, think context , Truly observe people and how they use there phones, just cause you put a hole in something dose not make it more ergonomic or even intuitive for users. By putting holes through 90% of the form there is no longer room for display which is something users want more than some shwanky key interaction. The form language is static (e.i Grid pattern) no real thought to how it could resonate with users on visual level, no flow or elegance. Very poetic description but the design should be able to speak for itself without any marketing included:)

  • Dan says:

    …. I can see a lot of mistake calls being made on this device… If a kid got a hold of it, your bill would sky rocket and you’d have a lot of angry people.
    Also the ergonomics of the design are questionable; the user would have to put effort into putting their finger through each hole, which requires more body motions, and ultimately become exhausting over a period of time.
    And sure, the holes are labeled, but you have to be looking from a particular vantage point to even see them, otherwise you cant tell what hole is what.

  • jack says:

    stick it in the hole. that's what she said

  • jack says:

    stick it in the hole. that's what she said

  • henryjoe says:

    This mobile really gives a magical experience in dialing option,as this type of improvement in the mobile technology should be encouraged for future development. But some drawbacks in this type of phones makes it less popular.

  • henryjoe says:

    This mobile really gives a magical experience in dialing option,as this type of improvement in the mobile technology should be encouraged for future development. But some drawbacks in this type of phones makes it less popular.

  • Its design reflects human connectivity in a less material/mechanical, more sensual, way. Tarati is a subtle device, but ever-so-powerful in its fearlessness.”

  • Neil Ward says:

    Where can I buy this! I love this idea and design. It would be refreshing to have a phone that is just a phone.

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